Guatemala Mission Trip

Join us as we serve in the beautiful country of Guatemala 

 

Dates:  January 7-14, 2017 and June 10-17, 2017

Cost:  $1750

Includes: air fare, accommodations, food, ground transportation and the projects in Guatemala.

Does NOT include: passport, immunizations, travel medical insurance (required), food during the air travel, transportation to/from the  US airport, excess baggage fees, personal expenses such as needed medicines and toiletries.


June Trip

$250 deposit due with application

$900 due by February 15, 2017

$1750 due by May 15, 2017

 

January Trip

$250 deposit due with application

$900 due by October, 2016

$1750 due by November 30, 2016


Projects

  • Children's ministry - Teach bible lessons, crafts, games and music with the children in the villages and the orphanage 
  • Building or work project - Depending on the need or request from the Guatemalans
  • Feeding Center - Everyone will participate in one or more days of bringing and serving food for the hungry
  • Orphanage Ministry - Everyone will have the opportunity to spend time with the children at the orphanage 
  • Worship - Everyone will worship with the Guatemalan believers, with opportunities to share testimonies or special music 

Minister to children 

Minister to children 

Minister to the orphaned and abandoned 

Minister to the orphaned and abandoned 

Feed the hungry

Feed the hungry

Make a difference 

Make a difference 


To join the team

Download and fill out the forms below




Merry  Christmas

Merry Christmas

The  children of our ministries in many parts of the world wish a Merry  Christmas to Allow The Children and we want to pass it on to all of you, who are part of this ministry.

Medical Clinics in 2016 ( Nepal)

Medical Clinics in 2016 ( Nepal)

Our medical clinic project this year was  for an earthquake affected area.  Up into the mountains we went almost higher than the vehicle was able to go.  We found people in need, not because of the earthquake alone but because  their villages were  far  away from medical facilities.   The country was also in the beginnings of a blockade preventing medical supplies  from coming into   ANY where in the country, so of course, the  more remote areas were at even greater disadvantage. 

Every member of the team served in a needed role-- just as the body of  Christ should function.  Some were preparing meals. Some were organizing and distributing the medicines.  Some carried boxes, set up and organized for each day's clinic.   Pastors  from the area met with the people, prayed with them, and offered literature.  The doctor was the reason the people came, but those who were willing heard the gospel.

We distributed  Allow The Women kits  and spent some time with each woman to show  her  how to use the supplies.  What a blessing it was to give  something so beautiful and so useful to women who had so little. 

The Pastor Training  Project

The Pastor Training Project

This important project is bringing training to men in four countries who are pastors, evangelists and cell group leaders-- who are already leading and teaching.  They are able to multiply and teach others also.

Sep 2015    Pastor  Rene  Gonzalez and his wife, Irene  taught pastors and wives in Nicaragua.

Oct  2015   Dr. Shean  Phillips will  be going to Haiti to conduct our very first pastor training for that country  

Oct  2015   Matt St. Clair and Don Updike will be going to Burundi, Africa to train pastors.

Nov 2015   Jim Warner and  Brian Hoffman will be going to Nepal to train pastors.

Allow  The  Women

Allow The Women

 Allow The Women-- to attend school and to work their jobs, to go about their daily lives and to meet their responsibilities. Many girls in developing countries struggle with how to manage their menstruation. Disposable products  are rarely available and financially unattainable. Girls might miss five days of school every month for lack of a solution for this problem. Women might  lose income from their jobs.  A recent problem is  the earthquake in  Nepal. Many families lost everything they had.

 We are doing a project to make re-usable menstrual pads. We hope to provide them to earthquake affected women in Nepal and also a set for every teen girl in our sponsorship program in all of our countries.

  Walkways for the Blind children

Walkways for the Blind children

   The  School for the Blind in  Burundi, Africa has three buildings.  The children constantly move among them. One is the dorm where they live. The dining room is in one and classrooms in the third.

 The ground was rough and uneven. Muddy puddles formed both a safety hazard and a chance to spend the remainder of the day with wet feet.  ( The blind cannot see the puddles.)   There are other needs and projects  waiting to be done, but it blesses me to see these permanent walk ways built.  There are three of them-- to protect the way between each of the buildings.

Sponsorship Project

Sponsorship Project

Most of you who read our blog or receive our newsletter already sponsor one or more children. We appreciate you so much. We need more sponsors, especially for some children who have waited for a long time. We are hoping that some of our faithful sponsors might help us reach out to some areas outside our own circles to some  relatives or neighbors who might be willing to do what you do. We can send you a photo of a child who needs a sponsor and a fill in card. Would you talk to someone you know who might be interested? If you can find one more sponsor, you multiply the help you are already giving.

There is no obligation and no need to explain if you do not find a sponsor. No need even to send anything back. You can keep the photo and use it to pray for the child. Contact us!

Orphaned in Nepal

   Sabita and  Jeewan are orphans-- not because their parents died.  As far as we know, both are still alive.  But both have abandoned the two children, leaving with no contact for some time.  They were living with grand parents until the earthquake, but the house was destroyed and the grandparents are struggling for survival.  Sabita and  Jeewan have come into one of our children's homes in  Nepal.   We will care for them and educate them, disciple them in God's Word and someday launch them into life where we hope they will lead and minister to many others.   Life is hard.   Earthquakes are hard.  Yet our God uses the hard things to move his people to the places he wants them to be.

Nepal and the devastation







 During our visit to Nepal, it was easy to drive through parts of the capital city and forget that an earthquake happened here. But turn a corner and  a reminder might loom before us-- a building crumbled to the ground or an empty shell dangling the reminder to all  who pass. A five story building might have uprooted and now leaning against its neighbor building.  Or-- it might be standing as if unaffected, but a closer look  reveals frightening cracks, as if one more small shake might bring it down.  People were still living in tents, whether their building stood or not. If it still stood, there was the fear that something might bring it down.  The ground still shook almost daily.  I was aware of some of the tremors and sometimes I heard about them from others or read in the daily internet news.                                                    

Outside the city, whole villages have been destroyed.   Houses built  from mud and stone went down with the first  tremors.  Some of them can be rebuilt from the same materials, but in other cases, the ground was left unstable.  The people need to move to another place and start life again with nothing. The suffering is impossible to grasp, especially as rainy season is upon the land.  The rains make shelter a critical priority and  it needs to be more than fabric tents.  The rains mean the time of planting -- and those who miss planting also miss reaping. The agricultural cycle is a fact of life in the village-yet the land that the family owned might be gone, or no longer habitable.

Please pray for our people in  Nepal.   Even if they have no personal loss, the suffering is all around them.  Allow was able to help as we wired earthquake relief funds to four different areas.  Our trusted partners carried food and water, tents and medicines to people that the government agencies seemed to forget. Now we are busy with plans for a new children's home to  orphaned and homeless children from one village which was forced to move.                    
                    

A House on the River


This is the house of one of the new children in our sponsorship program in the Amazon.  Actually, it is a better house than most.  It is the home of the pastor and his family for this village. The ministry in the Amazon is very much like our work in other countries.  The people are poor.  We want to disciple and educate children from believers' families to be the next leaders for the community.  We want to support and encourage and enable the evangelism already in progress in the villages.  Let the church in America and her resources stand beside these dear believers as they labor in the Amazon.

Children of the Amazon

Boats are a way of life on the  Amazon.  Children paddle their way to school and home again. One school we visited was three classrooms, the only building in the area that was still above water and it only barely so.   Flooding this year was higher than in  many previous years.  We have taken some children of pastors into our program  for sponsorship. We hope to  help and encourage them in  their ministry work.

Amazing Amazon

  In the last week of  May 2015, I  spent a part of my life on board this boat.  We  zipped along  waterways, like roads, in the Amazon  River, braving  hot sun, sudden  torrential rains, fellow boaters and river creatures.  The driver, that is the man handling the motor at the back, used a GPS device to navigate  canals that looked identical to me. Unlike  American waters, there were no recreational boaters here.  Everyone was going somewhere, usually with boat loaded down as ours was--with supplies, livestock and children.  I noticed that dogs seemed to enjoy the experience more than other animals.  The best part was the beautiful scenery and of course the ministry among the villages. The worst part was sitting with no back rest for hours.  I suffered  from my lack of  Spanish fluency, except when we stopped in a village.  The indigenous people did not speak Spanish which put us all on a level field.  Life in the village was like villages in many places where we work.  Homes were simple shelters,  Food was home grown-- plentiful in harvest and perhaps scarce at other times.  Fishing is important. Many of these villages have a church building and a body of believers planted by the missionary who was hosting me.

The Earthquake House in Nepal

  An earthquake house is one that will not kill you if it falls. We are building one of these for the Action Love Children's Home.  It is basically structured from bamboo and sheet metal.  Rainy season is rushing towards us and this  should be a good shelter from the rain.  Even more than that, it will be a place to call home and a place where the children can sleep without fear.

Beginning in the Amazon

The  Amazon-- with everything  going on in our ministry right now, it  might  not seem to be the time to expand to a new ministry area.  Yet, plans for  a survey trip  to  South  America have been in the works for over a year. This is not the first time that conflicts, distractions and even overwhelming events have come just at the time when we were about to open a new ministry project.  Please pray for the people-- especially the children-- of the  Amazon and whether it is time  for Allow to begin work among them. Next week, 27 May, I will be flying out to visit two ministry areas with the intention of establishing relationships and possible ministry partnership for sponsorship of children and possibly pastor training.

Church planting in Burundi

Please keep a careful watch on the news from  Burundi.  Their elections are scheduled late in June. A recent government takeover was stopped, preventing what our missionary contact felt sure would be the beginning of another long, bloody war.  He tells us that he and his family  can hear gunshots at night, but they are  still able to move about town. He has two tiny little girls and his wife is expecting another baby in the same week as the elections.  I think that none of us would blame him if he got his family out of there, but he soldiers on-- doing the work he was called to do, and the Lord is blessing it. Read the words directly from him as he reports to us about the building of church building that we have funded there:
As far as the church plant on the property, that is having to be delayed a little bit, one factor is the political situation (in the current political climate it would be difficult to take large teams up from the city to help with the initial evangelism efforts etc...),  The other factor is that the nearby village church that will be helping with the plant is in the middle of its own construction (currently like 30 people sit outside every week cause their building is packed and can only hold about 120). So the local leadership here in the city decided that it would be best for us to help that church finish its expansion project before working on building the building at the new property. They already have a  new foundation and are hoping to start building the beginning of July.  It would not be good to very quickly build a good sized building for the new church plant on the new property when the mother church is still stuck trying to accommodate the people they have! 
 
Things are always more complicated here in Africa than I would like :) But I guess it is not just Africa.

Living in Tents

 I am writing this note in  May, 2015, not quite a month since the first major earthquake shook Nepal. Since that time, smaller tremors, and aftershocks continue to plague the land.  Building that cracked, but remained standing  after the first event may fall anytime as the ground shaking continues.  Recovery  is a challenge under any circumstances, but nearly impossible when "another one" could come at any time. Many of our people are still living in tents, even if their house  was not damaged. They are searching out clean water and  cooking as best they can. Please pray for  Nepal-- that the shaking  will stop and the rebuilding can begin.

He came up through our program

 His father died some years ago, leaving  his mother a widow with three children.  We  joined in with sponsorship to help the children remain in school.  One sponsor stuck with him to  help him even through a  university program.  He  is scheduled to graduate this year with a degree in engineering, but  he spent this week working with our relief team, carrying needed supplies to the people.



Personal tragedy in Nepal

 To us, sitting in  America and just watching the news, it is just one pile of ruble after another.   But each one of those piles is a personal  tragedy to a family in  Nepal-- a family that was probably already struggling to survive.  This is one of the villages where  Allow works and where we  delivered supplies  this week.  People in the US sent checks to our office.  We sent  wires to Nepal.  Our partners bought food and tents, cooking oil and  bottled water. They loaded trucks and carried  the supplies to places like this one.

Earthquake in Nepal

On 25 April, the people of Nepal suffered a major earthquake.  We could only sit and wait as (thankfully) report after report came in from our partners to  inform us that they were safe.  Devastation reigns throughout the country. More orphans were made.  Thousands of families became homeless.  None of the partners and leaders working with Allow The Children died or suffered a serious injury. All of them were up and ready to help others in a remarkably short period of time.

God's people in the US gave generously, allowing us to send five emergency wires to our close partners-- quickly making a difference all over Nepal.